Station

I really liked the strip where she was talking about how being trans doesn’t mean she needs to buy into the forever sweet and passive BS version of femininity and that she CAN be a female, trans AND an asshole.

It’s so HARD to reject that BS even when you recognise how harmful it can be. I can only imagine that it’s even harder for trans women, who (a) apparently STILL need to perform hyper-femininity to get taken seriously by professionals and access medical services to physically transition, (b) thanks to our awful society have even more reason than most women to at least sometimes want to blur silently into the background, (c) have spent some portion of their lives being told that they are not female, which must build extra internal pressure to embrace all aspects which can be spun as being female, even the cruddier ones. And she’s what, 19? She has her head more together than a lot of people twice her age.

So yeah, she’s being an asshole. It’s delaying plot from happening. It’s irritating. If she doesn’t knock it off soon it’ll cross over into bullying territory and that really isn’t OK.

But it’s still kinda awesome that she’s comfortable being such an asshole.

Dumbing of Age

Brett Kavanaugh confirmation: Victory for Trump in Supreme Court battle

Brett Kavanaugh, watched by his family, is administered the judicial oath by Justice Anthony Kennedy Image copyright US Supreme Court
Image caption Brett Kavanaugh, surrounded by his family, was administered the judicial oath by outgoing justice Anthony Kennedy

President Donald Trump’s controversial nominee for the Supreme Court, Brett Kavanaugh, has been sworn in following weeks of rancorous debate.

The Senate earlier backed his nomination by 50 votes to 48.

Mr Kavanaugh had been embroiled in a bitter battle to stave off claims of sexual assault, which he denies.

But after an 11th-hour investigation by the FBI into the allegations, enough wavering senators decided to support the nomination.

His confirmation hands Mr Trump a political victory ahead of key mid-term elections in November.

Before the vote, hundreds of people protested against Mr Kavanaugh’s nomination at the US Capitol in Washington.

Media playback is unsupported on your device

Media captionThe moment Vice President Mike Pence announces Brett Kavanaugh’s win

During the vote, other protesters shouted “shame” from the public gallery and Vice-President Mike Pence had to call for order to be restored.

Mr Kavanaugh’s appointment is for life and he will strengthen conservative control of the nine-judge court, which has the final say on US law.

The 53 year old was sworn in on Saturday evening in a private ceremony at the Supreme Court. Chief Justice John Roberts administered the constitutional oath and retired justice Anthony Kennedy – whom Mr Kavanaugh is replacing – administered the judicial oath.

Protesters had gathered outside the court and at one point some ran up the steps and banged on its ornate doors. Other demonstrators climbed on the nearby statue of justice.

Image copyright AFP
Image caption Protesters sat on the statue of justice outside the Supreme Court

What has Mr Trump said?

He sent out a tweet of congratulations:

Later he spoke to reporters aboard Air Force One, saying Mr Kavanaugh had withstood a “horrible attack by the Democrats” and that women were “outraged” at what had happened to the nominee.

Mr Trump also said he was “100% certain” that the woman who had accused Mr Kavanaugh of sexual assault, Christine Blasey Ford, had named the wrong person.

So what were the numbers in the Senate?

The upper house is split 51-49 in favour of the Republicans and the vote was largely along party lines. In the end, there was indeed a two-vote margin, the closest nomination vote since 1881.

The only party dissenters were Republican Senator Lisa Murkowski, who had intended to vote no, and Democrat Joe Manchin, who voted yes.

That should have meant a 51-49 tally, but the absence of Republican Steve Daines, a yes voter who was at his daughter’s wedding, altered the final figures.

Media playback is unsupported on your device

Media captionDonald Trump’s nominee has been embroiled in a bitter battle over sexual assault allegations.

Ms Murkowski opted instead to simply mark herself as “present”, leaving the final vote 50-48.

What was said in the Senate?

In their final summations, the two Senate party leaders reflected how bitter the divide had become.

Minority Democrat leader Chuck Schumer said Mr Kavanaugh did not belong on the bench as he had “obscured his views to the American people”, “repeatedly misled the Senate” and delivered one of the “bitterest and most partisan testimonies ever presented by a nominee”.

He also said Mr Trump had “stooped to new depths” in mocking the testimony of Christine Blasey Ford.

Image copyright Reuters
Image caption The decision of Susan Collins to vote yes helped sway the final tally

Mr Schumer said that for all those who opposed the nomination, “there is one answer – vote” in the November mid-term elections.

Majority Republican leader Mitch McConnell said Mr Kavanaugh was a “serious scholar, a brilliant student of the law and a meticulous and dedicated public servant”.

He said events had “strained our basic principles of fairness and justice” and that the vote showed the Senate was “an institution where evidence and facts matter”.

He spoke of “intimidation by the mob” and said the Senate vote should be one “to turn away from darkness”.

Ms Murkowski had earlier said that although Mr Kavanaugh was a “good man”, he was “not the right person for the court at this time” and his “appearance of impropriety has become unavoidable”.

Joe Manchin is facing a difficult re-election campaign in West Virginia, a traditionally Republican state that Mr Trump won by a landslide. He said he “found Judge Kavanaugh to be a qualified jurist”.

There were shouts of “shame” from the public gallery as he voted yes.

Two Republican waverers, Susan Collins and Jeff Flake, finally decided to back the judge.

Analysis: Just the beginning

By Anthony Zurcher, BBC North America reporter

Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation to the Supreme Court has been decided. The political war, however, is just beginning.

Donald Trump’s court pick generated a controversy that captured the nation’s attention in a way that few political issues do. It generated daily headlines rivalled only by the US quadrennial presidential elections.

Now that the bombs have been thrown, it’s time to assess the fallout.

Read more from Anthony

Why is the court so important?

Basically, it’s the final arbiter of US law.

It has the ultimate say on such contentious issues as abortion and gun control.

The Democrats are still smarting from the previous Supreme Court appointment. Republicans last year successfully stalled the process, meaning it fell to Mr Trump, not Barack Obama, to nominate the new justice. Mr Trump’s choice of Neil Gorsuch strengthened the conservative leaning.

All eyes will now be on November’s mid-term elections. Mr Trump will be able to campaign on the back of an important victory, but commentators will be watching closely how the Kavanaugh affair affects women voters.

source

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Complete Voters Guide

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2018 Midterm Election

Navigating The Guide

The voter guide is easily navigated by using the slide out menu that appears on the left side of the page after you push the red button labeled “Election Guide Menu” which is located on every guide page.

Guide Introduction

Welcome to the voter’s guide at seandelahanty.com.  The “complete” is kind of a teaser because the election is on going and will only be complete after the results are in.  We do have a section for displaying the results when that happens but before we get ahead of ourselves there is work to be done.

You should be congratulated on taking steps towards making informed decisions on these very impactful local elections.  Sean talks in a recent video about the importance of making informed decisions and we hope this guide helps you.

An individual can review their registration or register to vote here. You can look up what districts you live in and see those districts on a map. If you’d like to review the demographic statistical information of a precinct we’ve included a tool for that and will make additional resources available to you as they come available.

Our extensive FAQ section attempts to answer questions related to the election and offers you the ability to submit questions.  While the focus of this site is Judge Sean Delahanty the focus of this guide is you the voter.

This guide includes various maps, databases, links and external resources which are outside of our site’s control. We have made every attempt to ensure the accuracy of the information in this guide but can not guarantee all of the details here.  We have searched the web and collected information from dozens of sites and are only as good as our sources.

Information has been included from the Jefferson County Clerk Bobbie Holsclaw’s site.  We’ve also pulled information from Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes‘s site.  LOJIC is a collection of data repositories which have been an important help in creating this guide.

We have pulled RSS feeds from various campaign sites to create one aggregated news feed it is available at Vote Louisville.  Any campaign, including Sean Delahanty’s competitor Lisa Langford is welcome to post to that site.

Thank you for visiting and check back soon to see what we’ve added as this will not actually be complete until November 6, 2018.

If you like this guide please share it!  If you have suggestions of content we should include feel free to complete the form below.

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Healing

Well, it’s not the worst superpower ever, but is “having nicknames ready to go for everyone” the lamest superpower ever?

I’m trying to remember the nicknames she bestowed, but this is one of those searches for which tags aren’t particularly effective. These are what I’ve been able to recall/find:

Danny: Wonderbread
Joyce: Blue Eyes
Jason: Bow Tie

Others?

Dumbing of Age

Brett Kavanaugh: Key senators back embattled Supreme Court choice

Brett Kavanaugh Image copyright Reuters
Image caption Mr Kavanaugh’s confirmation process has been one of the most contentious for years

Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court seat looks all but confirmed after he won the backing of key senators despite an FBI investigation into sexual assault allegations.

Republican Senator Susan Collins and Joe Manchin, a Democrat, both indicated their backing for the judge on Friday.

Judge Kavanaugh’s confirmation would tilt America’s highest court in favour of conservatives.

The court has the final say on issues such as abortion and gun control.

A final vote on whether Judge Kavanaugh will join the nine-member panel is scheduled for Saturday. If confirmed, the position is for life.

Hours before the undecided senators indicated their backing, the US Senate narrowly advanced President Donald Trump’s nominee to a final vote by voting to strictly limit debate on the issue.

Friday’s “cloture” vote – 51-49 in favour – was a test of support for the embattled nominee who has faced allegations of sexual misconduct from three women, including Prof Christine Blasey Ford.

What did the senators say?

Senator Collins ended hopes she would side with Democrats in the final vote, telling fellow senators she did not believe the “charges can fairly prevent Judge Kavanaugh from serving on the court”.

“The facts presented do not mean that Professor Ford was not sexually assaulted that night or at some other time but they do lead me to conclude that the allegations failed to meet the more likely than not standard,” she said.

Media playback is unsupported on your device

Media captionCollins: I vote to confirm Judge Kavanaugh

Senator Manchin, who is up for re-election in West Virginia, a traditionally Republican state that Mr Trump won by a landslide, told the Senate moments later he “found Judge Kavanaugh to be a qualified jurist who will follow the constitution and determine cases based on the legal findings before him”.

What has the reaction been?

The reaction has been swift, with former president George HW Bush and White House press secretary Sarah Sanders both tweeting their support for Ms Collins.

Mr Manchin, however, has found himself in the firing line.

A liberal group which raises money for Democratic candidates, Priorities USA, immediately said it would not be giving any funds to his re-election campaign.

Outside, protesters shouted “shame on you” as Mr Manchin spoke to reporters about his decision.

Meanwhile, a tweet asking someone to run for Senator Collins’s seat in Maine when it comes up for re-election in 2020 from former White House communication chief, Jen Psaki, had a swift response from former UN ambassador Susan Rice.

She later clarified she was “not making any announcements” but was “deeply disappointed in Senator Collins’s vote for Kavanaugh”.

Alaska’s Lisa Murkowski – a Republican who voted against the nomination earlier on Friday – is yet to officially say which way she will vote on Saturday.

However, former vice-presidential candidate Sarah Palin tweeted she could “see 2022 from my house”, suggesting Senator Murkowski would face a fight for her seat at the next election should she not side with her Republican colleagues in the vote to confirm Judge Kavanaugh.

Analysis: Just the beginning

By Anthony Zurcher, BBC North America reporter

Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation to the Supreme Court is all but certain. The Republican Party has the votes and the battle appears over. The political war, however, is just beginning.

Donald Trump’s court pick generated a controversy that captured the nation’s attention in a way that few political issues do. It generated daily headlines rivalled only by the US quadrennial presidential elections.

Now that the bombs have been thrown, it’s time to assess the fallout.

Read more from Anthony

What was the FBI inquiry about?

In public testimony last week Prof Ford said she had been assaulted by Judge Kavanaugh when they were both teenagers in 1982.

Judge Kavanaugh denied the claim – and allegations that he drank to the point of memory loss at the time – in a feisty confrontation with senators.

Media playback is unsupported on your device

Media captionChristine Blasey Ford said she was “100%” sure Brett Kavanaugh assaulted her

After the testimony, President Trump agreed to a new FBI inquiry.

Federal agents are believed to have spoken to five witnesses regarding Prof Ford’s accusations and another four other witnesses involving a separate accusation by Deborah Ramirez, who said the nominee had exposed himself to her when they were both at Yale University. He denies Ms Ramirez’s allegations, too.

Media playback is unsupported on your device

Media captionFeinstein and McConnell have very different views on the FBI report

Mr Trump and his fellow Republicans said the new FBI report had cleared their nominee.

But Democratic senators said it had been incomplete.

The lawyers of both women have also complained that several witnesses they had offered to the FBI to corroborate their claims had not been contacted at all.

source

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Sean Delahanty And The Opioid Crisis Are Discussed In Latest Video

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Josh Hartman, a Louisville defense attorney, discusses Sean Delahanty‘s compassion for those who are touched by the opioid crisis.  Delahanty understands the to end the crime we have to address the addiction in our community.  This crisis affects us in jail over crowding and theft and Judge Delahanty has addressed this connection.

For more information about Judge Sean Delahanty us at https://www.seandelahanty.com.  For information about other local races and candidates or to create a sample ballot check out our Complete Voter Guide that focuses on Louisville races.

Sean Delahanty

Brett Kavanaugh: Hundreds arrested in Supreme Court protest

Media playback is unsupported on your device

Media captionProtesters take to Capitol Hill

Hundreds of protesters against US President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh have been arrested in Washington, DC.

Comedian Amy Schumer and model Emily Ratajkowski were among 302 women held for demonstrating against the nominee.

Republicans earlier declared an FBI report had exonerated him of sexual assault allegations.

But Democrats said the five-day inquiry was “incomplete” because it was limited by the White House.

The Senate will hold a procedural vote on the nominee on Friday.

The likelihood of Judge Kavanaugh winning a full Senate vote appeared to increase on Thursday after two Republicans whose backing will be essential gave a positive account of the FBI inquiry.

But the confirmation is not a certainty, with several senators undecided and one at risk of missing a vote because he is attending his daughter’s wedding.

If confirmed to the lifetime position on America’s highest court, the 53-year-old is expected to help conservatives dominate the nine-member panel, which has the final say on issues such as abortion, gun control and voting rules.

As the vote neared, the judge defended his neutrality in a Wall Street Journal editorial titled, “I am an independent, impartial judge”.

Addressing his angry testimony to the Senate Judiciary Committee, where he branded the allegations against him an “orchestrated political hit”, he wrote: “I know that my tone was sharp, and I said a few things I should not have said.”

What happened at the protests?

Thousands of mainly female demonstrators marched through the nation’s capital on Thursday, starting at the appeals court where Judge Kavanaugh currently presides.

They converged on Capitol Hill and held a rally outside the Supreme Court, chanting: “Kavanaugh has got to go!”

Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Comedian Amy Schumer (C) joins the protest on Capitol Hill

Police rounded the protesters up in a Senate office building after they sat down and refused to budge.

There was another protest in front of Trump Tower in New York City.

What was the reaction to the FBI report?

President Trump and his fellow Republicans declared the FBI report had cleared their nominee, as they sounded increasingly confident Judge Kavanaugh would win confirmation.

Senators said the FBI had spoken to five witnesses connected to accusations by Christine Blasey Ford, who alleges a drunken Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her in 1982.

Federal agents are also said to have spoken to four other witnesses involving a separate accusation by Deborah Ramirez, who claims the nominee exposed himself to her when they were both were at Yale University. He denies both allegations.

Media playback is unsupported on your device

Media captionFeinstein and McConnell have very different views on the FBI report

“This investigation found no hint of misconduct,” Senate Judiciary Committee chairman Chuck Grassley said in a statement.

Senate Republicans plan a procedural “cloture” vote at 10:30 on Friday (14:30 GMT), which is required to move to a final vote, scheduled on Saturday at around 17:30 (21:30 GMT).

But Democratic Senator Dianne Feinstein said the FBI report was “the product of an incomplete investigation”, saying key corroborating witnesses had been snubbed. Another Democratic Senator, Richard Blumenthal, told reporters it was a “whitewash”.

Image copyright Reuters
Image caption Anti-Kavanaugh protesters rally outside the US Supreme Court

White House spokesman Raj Shah said: “What critics want is a never-ending fishing expedition into high school drinking.”

One Republican Senator, John Cornyn, raised eyebrows by telling his party this was “our Atticus Finch moment”, a reference to the lawyer in classic novel To Kill A Mockingbird who refutes a false rape allegation.

What did undecided senators say?

Given that Republicans have a razor-thin 51-49 margin of control in the Senate, the party can potentially only afford one defection if it wants to confirm Judge Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court, assuming Democrats vote the same way.

His nomination has been at the mercy of three wavering senators, but two of those – Jeff Flake and Susan Collins – appeared to respond positively to the FBI report.

Media playback is unsupported on your device

Media caption‘Ford is a liar’: Trump supporters’ unequivocal backing for Kavanaugh

Another wavering Republican senator, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, reportedly met sexual assault survivors in her office on Thursday.

Complicating matters, the office of Republican Steve Daines said he was planning to attend his daughter’s wedding in Montana on Saturday – meaning he might not be around to vote, or that the vote may be held open until he can return to take part.

Another Republican, Cory Gardner, who previously said he would back Judge Kavanaugh, is yet to decide how he will vote, the Denver Post reported.

A previously undecided Democratic Senator, Heidi Heitkamp, said she would vote against Judge Kavanaugh, citing “concerns about his past conduct”.

And Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia, the only Democrat who remains undecided, said he would finish reading the FBI report on Friday morning.

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Hey

Oh, I am not going to take that away from him. This is unusual for him, given how he has avoided conflict to his detriment a lot, like cowing to his mom.

I do wonder if, well, hooking up with Mike has been good for his confidence, or if he otherwise would take this step.

Dumbing of Age

How To Register To Vote Before Oct. 9th Deadline

Judge Sean Delahanty and his campaign members want to remind Louisville voters that we offer a comprehensive voter guide that includes maps, candidates, races, election polling and statistics.  To take advantage of our best tools we encourage you to check out two places on our site.

Louisville Election FAQs

Louisville Election FAQs

We’re posting one of our FAQs below that walks voters step by step through the online voter registration process.  To see more useful voter information check out our full Louisville Election FAQs.

Registering to vote is extremely easy and you can do it in likely less time than it will take to finish reading this in depth answer.

First click this link Online Voter Registration where you will click Next.

Select if you are registering yourself. “I am registering as an individual.” Click OK

You will then need to check each box on the page basically saying you are citizen who isn’t mentally incompetent, not a felon, 18 yrs old and not voting somewhere else.

Enter your social security number and date of birth. Click Next

If the system recognizes you your name, phone and email will populate, if it is correct press Next.  If it is not correct, correct it.  If it is blank, fill it in and click Next.

Select your party affiliation and click next.

Enter your address and click Next, if it is already entered then click Next.

The final screen will provide you a chance to Review your registration.  After you have verified it is correct choose a signature method.  You can “Use my KY Driver’s License” or “I will sign digitally.”

Signing digitally is quick and easy.  Just use your mouse to “sign” your name and then click Next.

You’ll then be shown a form that you can print for your records, but it is not an official document.  After a couple weeks you’ll receive confirmation from your county clerk that you’re registered.

Applications must be submitted by:

Primary Election: April 23, 2018

General Election: October 9, 2018

You must be registered by October 9, 2018 to participate in the November 6, 2018 General Election.  Those wanting to register may do so online or in person at the County Clerk’s office or at a Driver License (DMV) office.  Unlike typical races Judicial Races are nonpartisan.  Kentucky allows you to vote “straight party ticket” or for every candidate of a specific party with one box. If you do vote straight party you still need to vote in the NONPARTISAN Judicial races.

Check out our full voter guide following Metro Mayor, Metro Council, Maps, Districts, Candidates, Jefferson County Offices and much more.

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Sean Delahanty